A Fu Cut and Ancient Hairdos

A Fu Cut and Ancient Hairdos

A Fu cut is a traditional hairstyle for children in the summer. It is cool and easy to keep.
A Fu is a traditional character among the Huishan clay figurines created 400 years ago. In the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) there existed a large number of temples in Huishan, Jiangsu Province, where pilgrims went to pray for longevity, good fortune, offspring. They would generally offer clay figurines as a sacrifice the Longevity God, the Goddes of Mercy, and the various flying apsaras-celestial beings, of which Fu was the most popular.
According to folklore, A Fu was a youth who lost his life in a battle with demons. As a gesture of conmemoration, the local people in his hometown fashioned his likeness in clay. The Image gradually evolved and extended to that of a pair of a chubby children: a little boy with all his hair, apart from a peach-shape lock over his forehead, shaved, and a little girl with clumps o hair on either side of her head.
In ancient China, girls usually wore their hair in two coils or plaits, while small boys wore various styles of bangs on the forehead, at the back, on either side of head, or in short braids.