Silk Road Geography

Silk Road Geography

Silk Road extents from east to west, more than 7000 km, which constructed the bridge to exchange the cultures between different cultures. Particularly in Xinjiang, wester region was its old name handed down from Han dynasty, is a place where four civilizations including Chinese, Indian, Greece and Islamic ones going here. From the ruin and relics excavated in this vast territory, we can easily conclude even image the splendid cities and towns here. The distance did not stop human to travel from Europe to China, the Greece angel patterns on the cloth of tomb owner in Qiemo, Xinjiang proves it.

Spanning Two Continents
The 7000 km route spanned China, Central Asia, Northern India, and the Parthian and Roman Empires. It connected the Yellow River Valley to the Mediterranean Sea and passed through places such as Chinese cities Gansu and Xinjiang and present-day countries Iran, Iraq and Syria.
Northwestern Indians who lived near the Ganges River played prominent roles as middlemen in the China-Mediterranean silk trade because as early as the third century AD, they understood that silk was a lucrative product of the Chinese Empire. The trading relationship between the Chinese and the Indians grew stronger with increased Han expansion into Central Asia. The Chinese would trade their silk with the Indians for precious stones and metals such as jade, gold, and silver, and the Indians would trade the silk with the Roman Empire. Silk proved to be an expensive import for the Roman Empire since its trade across Indian and Central Asia was heavily controlled by the Parthian Empire. The trade along the Silk Road has proved to be the successful role to promote the development of human civilizations, because the road not only transfer products, but also religions, words, races that played key role in the human society,